Monday, June 29, 2009

Taiwan issues Butterfly Souvenir Sheet


Taiwan Butterflies Postage Stamps (Issue of 2009)


To call public attention to conserve natural habitat, Chunghwa Post will issue a souvenir sheet on swallowtail butterflies. The souvenir sheet is printed in the shape of a butterfly. Each of the souvenir sheet consists of two NT$5.00 denominated stamps and two NT$ 12.00 denominated stamps. Printed by Cardon Enterprise Co., Ltd., the souvenir sheet was released on June 25, 2009. The designs follow:

1. Papilio xuthus Linnaeus (NT$5.00): Commonly known as Asian swallowtail, it has dark brown wings, although the coloration in females is somewhat lighter. As for distinguishing marks, there is a pale yellow crescent (lunule) behind each cell of the forewings and the hind wings, and there are some light yellow markings near the base of the hind wings. The males and females are similar in appearance except for some obvious orange markings on either side of the bluish gray band on the underside of females’ hind wings. These are not immediately noticeable on males. In addition, there is a black spot on the front edge of males’ hind wings, which is absent in females. This butterfly inhabits the edges of wooded areas, places where there have been landslides near riverbeds, and citrus orchards in low-elevation areas of the mountains.

2. Troides aeacus formosanus Rothschild (NT$5.00): It is commonly known as the Hengchun birdwing butterfly, small birdwing, or dwarf birdwing. The male has black wings, and the bright yellow markings on the upper side and underside of its hindwings are larger than those of the female. There are a row of black saw-tooth markings on the outer margin of its hind wings and some red markings on its thorax. Females are larger than males, with broader forewings and a complicated yellow and black pattern on their hind wings. This butterfly is an endemic subspecies to
Taiwan. It is listed as a rare and valuable protected species. It can be found in forests below 2,000 meters in elevation or in coastal areas.


3. Graphium agameinnon (L innaeus) (NT$ 12.00): It is commonly known as the tailed jay, green triangle, or green spotted triangle butterfly. Females and males have identical wing patterns. The male has black wings with four vertical rows of yellowish green spots on each wing. There is a fuzzy gray brand in the fold at the inner edge of the hind wings. Females lack the brand and are larger than males. The species inhabits the plains and low-elevation areas of the mountains in central and southern
Taiwan.


4. Papilio paris nakaharai Shirôzu (NT$ 12.00): Commonly known as the
Paris peacock, it has black wings and a faint green band on the sub marginal area of its forewings. There is a broad, metallic greenish blue marking on its hind wings, which shimmers during flight. It is one of the most beautiful butterflies in Taiwan. There is a row of red crescents on the outer edge of the underside of its hind wings. Females and males are similar in appearance, except that in males the blue marking on the upper side of the hind wing extends narrowly below and above. This butterfly inhabits the plains and low-elevation areas of the mountains in northern Taiwan.


The stamps were designed by professor Yang Ping-shih of the College of Bioresources and Agriculture, National Taiwan University and produced by Delta Design Corporation. As an innovation and to raise its value as a collectible, the souvenir sheet for this set of stamps is being printed in the shape of a butterfly, and on each stamp there is a small cutout area, which is also in the shape of a butterfly.A first day cover, folders with and without crystal mounts, a loose-leaf stamp album page and a set of maximum cards will be released along with the stamps, and will go on sale June 23, 2009. A pre-cancelled FDC with a souvenir sheet and a set of pre-cancelled maximum cards will go on sale June 25, 2009, the date of issuance of the stamps. For further information, please refer to the upcoming Philatelic Bulletin or Postal Service Today.

Interesting article about Taiwan butterflies
http://www.cosmosmagazine.com/node/1122



You Tube Video on Taiwan Butterflies:

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